Posts tagged “thickeners

I don’t have to Pei my own Wei for Spicy Chicken!

As far as my food preferences go I tend to like spicy food, although not all the time.  One of my favorite things before going gluten-free was to go get Chinese at one of several local carry-out places.  One of my go to dishes was General T’so’s chicken,  spicy, and sweet is one of the flavor combinations that I really dig.  As we know, Chinese food is generally off limits due to soy sauce.  Needless to say, I was bummed.  PF Chang’s and its sister Pei Wei have made our lives a little easier as far as Chinese carry-out.  After trying the Spicy chicken at Pei Wei I decided I had found a suitable replacement for General T’so!  Not quite the same, but it will do.  After a few trips I recently realized that not only did I like it, but I was pretty sure I could come up with my own version for a lot less money, and cut out the trip.

This is going to be a bit of a multi-step thing, but they are easy.  First thing you need to do is make your sauce.  For most cuisines there are sort of base flavors that are commonly used.  If you look at a lot of recipes of French dishes you will spot mirepoix which is simply 2 parts onion diced, and then one part each of celery and carrots.  This becomes the trinity in cajun cooking be replacing the carrots with green peppers.  Lemongrass and galangal are common in Thai dishes, and in Chinese garlic and ginger.  I took the garlic and ginger as a base flavor, and built my sauce from there.  Here’s what I came up with:

1 1/4 cup orange juice + lime juice to bring the total to 1 1/3 cup

1 TBSP sambal

1 TBSP honey

1 clove ginger crushed

1 quarter inch thick slice of ginger root

Place everything in a pot, and bring it up to a boil.  Then take 1 TBSP of corn starch, and combine with enough orange juice to make a slurry. With the pot still boiling add the slurry while whisking.  You don’t want clumps so, be sure you are mixing it while you pour.  Remove it from the heat, and cool.  Keep this in the fridge till you are ready to finish the dish.  Really, that was it!

The next thing I did was get all of the other ingredients prepped. I had four chicken breasts, because I wanted leftovers for lunch for the next few days at work.  I also had some broccoli, carrot, and yellow bell pepper. The chicken was cut into bite sized cubes, the broccoli I cut into florets, and the yellow pepper and carrot I sliced thinly.

From here this dish came together pretty much like my last stir-fry chicken post.  Start with the chicken, and sauté until cooked nearly through.  Then add the veggies, and cook until they are tender.  Add the sauce to the pan, and stir to combine, and coat everything.  Serve over rice, and enjoy!  If you are looking for a vegetarian dish, substitute tofu for the chicken, but remember to get the firmest you can otherwise it will break up while you try to sauté it.

A little bit of analysis:  Dinner was very tasty, but… not quite right.  It was fairly mild, and not quite sweet enough.  It was also not quite thick enough.  I still have about half the sauce left, and I think my next step will be to add a bit more honey, sambal, and thicken the sauce a little bit more.  It was fun to take a shot at reverse engineering a recipe from only tasting eating it.  I’m on the right path, so I’ll keep going a little further.  This was a little bit of a challenge just due to the fact that there is a fair amount going on in the sauce.

I hope that my experiment inspires you to see what you can do in the kitchen.  All it takes is paying attention to what you are eating, and taking a shot at replicating what you taste.  Remember that there is more to what you eat than just the taste.  There is flavor, scent, and texture.  See how close you can get!

If there is anything you would like me to take a shot at reply here, and I’ll see what I can do.  I’d love to hear from you guys!

Advertisements

Going backwards to go forward!

Since I went gluten-free I have been trying to figure out what to do about thickening sauces, soups and stews. Yesterday, at work I was talking to the chef, and he mentioned something that piqued my interest. This afternoon I picked up my copy of Escoffier, and flipped through until I found a section on roux. In this section he describes in great detail how to make a roux. As I got to the end of the section I found this:

From this it follows that, starch being the only one from among the different constituents of flour which really affects the thickening of sauces, there would be considerable advantage in preparing roux either from a pure form of it, or from substances with kindred properties, such as fecula, arrowroot, cornstarch, etc. It is only habit which causes flour to still be used as the binding agent of roux, and, indeed the hour is not so far distant when the advantages of the changes I propose will be better understood… From The Escoffier Cookbook by Auguste Escoffier 1989 edition

Apparently, not only can it be done, but it would only require half the amount of roux to thicken your sauce. Typically, I would use one pound of roux to thicken one gallon of liquid. This means that only half a pound would be required. Four ounces of butter and four ounces of starch. From what I was told yesterday, a brown roux can’t be done with cornstarch because it would scorch before it would brown. Its a start.